Local farmer builds solar panel array on land to fight Keystone XL pipeline

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SILVER CREEK, Neb., Jim Carlson's new solar panel array sends a message loud and clear to TransCanada.

"They'll have to go under it, around it or tear it down to get their dirty oil from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico," said Jim Carlson of Silver Creek.

The farmer has received multiple offers from the company to lay its pipe. The highest bid was a whopping $307,000.

Turning that chunk of change down was easy for the farmer because he says it's not worth compromising the water in his land.
contaminating the Nebraska water supply is something he believes the Keystone XL pipeline would have the potential to do.

"It might not be here. It might be on Tom's place or somebody else's place. They and they're neighbors, who get absolutely nothing out of it, will have to pay the price," said Carlson.

Other farmers share the same concern. One woman says she and her husband worked hard to purchase their land.

Their property is like their child. The thought of having someone tamper with it makes them sick.

"We have this pasture land that we're trying to put back onto native prairies grasses. To spend over thirty-eight years on it trying to improve it and have them come through and dig it all up and we have to start all over again, it just doesn't seem right," said Susan Dunavan of York.